Teacher Accreditation Authority Requirements

(Effective until 29 November 2022)


Teacher Accreditation Authority

A school can operate its own school-based TAA or it may choose to outsource its TAA by entering into an arrangement through a written agreement with another legal entity approved as a TAA that acts for one or more schools or EC Services.

The NESA Guidelines for the Regulation of Teacher Accreditation Authorities for Non-government Schools and Early Childhood Education Centres (“TAA Guidelines”) set the minimum requirements for approval for school-based TAAs under the TA Act.

NOTE: From 29 November 2022, NESA will become the sole authority to make teacher accreditation decisions. At that point, the Guidelines for the Regulation of Teacher Accreditation Authorities for Non-government Schools and Early Childhood Centres will no longer apply. NESA has published further information about the changes here.

All TAAs will continue making accreditation decisions until 29 November 2022 in accordance with their policies and procedures. From this date, school-based TAAs will no longer exist and schools will no longer make accreditation decisions. Schools will continue to play a key role in supporting teachers with accreditation.

Documenting Structure & 
Governance Arrangements for TAAs

A TAA must have documentation detailing the structural and governance arrangements of the TAA.

Documentation must include (but not necessarily in three separate documents):

  • an overview of the organisational structure of the TAA
  • a description of the responsibilities of all roles within the TAA
  • a delegation schedule only for those roles authorised by the TAA to make accreditation decisions or to represent the TAA.

Requirements for Policies 
and Procedures

In addition to documenting governance and organisational arrangements, the NESA TAA Guidelines require each TAA to have policies and procedures, as relevant across ten policy areas. This requirement may be addressed by documentation that covers more than one policy area, but all ten policy areas must be covered through the totality of the documentation. Each of the ten policy areas also requires documented procedures that describe how each policy is implemented. Procedures will typically provide details of what is done, by whom, how and when.

It is imperative that TAAs draft policies and procedures that reflect the actual circumstances and practices of the TAA and the school and/or EC service for which they make accreditation decisions.

Alignment with NESA Teacher Accreditation Policies

In drafting the documentation, policies and procedures required for TAA regulatory approval, school-based TAAs should also refer to requirements of NESA in relation to teacher accreditation matters. It is particularly important to check consistency of the school’s TAA policies, as well as school procedures, with requirements set out in the most recent versions of NESA’s Proficient Teacher Accreditation Policy, Maintenance of Accreditation at Proficient Teacher Policy and the Interim Suspension, Revocation and Voluntary Cancellation of Accreditation Policy. These are available through the NESA Teacher Accreditation website.

NOTE: From 29 November 2022, NESA will become the sole authority to make teacher accreditation decisions. At that point, the Guidelines for the Regulation of Teacher Accreditation Authorities for Non-government Schools and Early Childhood Centres will no longer apply. NESA has published further information about the changes here.

All TAAs will continue making accreditation decisions until 29 November 2022 in accordance with their policies and procedures. From this date, school-based TAAs will no longer exist and schools will no longer make accreditation decisions.